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Statewide Grievance Committee
Statewide Bar Counsel

Authorized House Counsel Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is Authorized House Counsel?
  2. How do I apply for Authorized House Counsel?
  3. Can I perform pro bono work as an Authorized House Counsel?
  4. What are my obligations to the Statewide Grievance Committee?
  5. How and when do I terminate my status?


1. What is Authorized House Counsel? 
An authorized house counsel is an out-of-state attorney who has been certified by the Connecticut courts to represent an employer in Connecticut as in-house counsel.

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2. How do I apply for Authorized House Counsel status? 
More information on being certified as an Authorized House Counsel.

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3. Can I perform pro bono work as an Authorized House Counsel? 
Yes. Authorized house counsel may provide pro bono legal services in Connecticut if they are under the supervision of an organized legal aid society or state/local bar association or a member of the Connecticut bar who is working with the legal aid society or bar association on the pro bono project. See Practice Book 2-15A(c)(5).

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4. What are my obligations to the Statewide Grievance Committee? 
An authorized house counsel has obligations similar to a Connecticut licensed attorney. You must abide by the Rules of Professional Conduct, you must register annually through an e-services account and you may be responsible for the Client Security Fund fee and the Attorney Occupational Tax.

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5. How and when do I terminate my status?
If you are no longer providing legal services to your employer in Connecticut, because you have relocated,  left that employment, or have been admitted to the Connecticut bar you must notify the Connecticut Bar Examining Committee so that your certification can be deactivated. Failure to do so is considered misconduct. Additional information.

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