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Statewide Grievance Committee
Statewide Bar Counsel

Certificate of Good Standing - Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How do I obtain a certificate of good standing?
  2. How long does it take to obtain a certificate of good standing?
  3. What does "good standing" mean? Can I practice law if I am not in good standing?


1. How do I obtain a certificate of good standing?

Generally, there are two types of certificates of good standing: a certificate of good standing and a certificate of good standing with disciplinary history. You may obtain a certificate of good standing from the Hartford Superior Court, and both a certificate of good standing and a certificate of good standing with disciplinary history from the Statewide Grievance Committee. Contact information for both offices appears at the end of this FAQ.

For some purposes, a third type of certificate is required – one from the highest court of the jurisdiction in which the attorney is admitted. In Connecticut, that is the Connecticut Supreme Court. Requests for these certificates must be made to the Hartford Superior Court.

The cost of a certificate of good standing from the Hartford Superior Court or the Statewide Grievance Committee is $10. The cost of a certificate of good standing with disciplinary history from the Statewide Grievance Committee is $20.Requests to either the Hartford Superior Court or to the Statewide Grievance Committee must be in writing, and must include the attorney’s name, address, daytime telephone number, juris number, and a self-addressed stamped envelope. Checks or money orders for certificates obtained from the Hartford Superior Court should be made payable to “Clerk, Superior Court.” Checks or money orders for certificates of good standing from the Statewide Grievance Committee should be made payable to the Connecticut Judicial Branch. The fee must accompany the request.

To be considered in good standing, the requesting attorney must be current with the annual attorney registration requirement and the Client Security Fund fee payment. See Practice Book §2-65.

If a request is defective for any reason, it will be returned.


A request for a certificate of good standing, or one from the highest court of the jurisdiction in which the attorney is admitted should be sent to:

Clerk of the Superior Court
Hartford Judicial District
95 Washington Street
Hartford, CT 06106
Tel: (860) 548-2700

A request for a certificate of good standing, or a certificate of good standing with disciplinary history should be sent to:

Statewide Grievance Committee
287 Main Street
Second Floor, Suite Two
East Hartford, CT 06118-1885
(860) 568-5157
Statewide.Grievance@jud.ct.gov

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2. How long does it take to obtain a certificate of good standing?

It depends. Generally requests are processed in 2 to 4 weeks. At certain times of the year, there is an increase in requests for certificates of good standing and a corresponding delay in processing the requests. Certificates of good standing that require a disciplinary history take longer to process because only the Statewide Bar Counsel’s office can issue these certificates. If you can establish good cause why you need a certificate of good standing quickly, you can request that the certificate be expedited. Any request for expedited service must be accompanied by a good cause statement and a prepaid, addressed overnight envelope.

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3. What does "good standing" mean? Can I practice law if I am not in good standing?

Good standing means the attorney 1) has been admitted to the bar of this state; 2) has registered with the Statewide Grievance Committee in compliance with Section 2-27(d) of the Connecticut Practice Book; 3) is in compliance with Client Security Fund requirements; and 4) is not under suspension, on inactive status, disbarred or resigned from the Connecticut bar.

If an attorney is not in good standing, but his or her license is still active, then the attorney can continue to practice law, however, he or she is not considered a commissioner of the superior court. Each attorney-at-law admitted to practice within the state, while in good standing, is a commissioner of the Superior Court and, in that capacity, may, within the state, sign writs and subpoenas, take recognizances, administer oaths and take depositions and acknowledgments of deeds. Each attorney in good standing may also issue subpoenas to compel the attendance of witnesses and subpoenas duces tecum in administrative proceedings. Section 51-85 of the Connecticut General Statutes. As a matter of policy, the appellate courts in Connecticut do not allow attorneys, who are not in good standing, to appear before them. Failure to register with the Statewide Grievance Committee is considered misconduct.

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